id_restore_mayfix_2015001004.jpg id_restore_mayfix_2015001003.jpg id_restore_mayfix_2015001002.jpg
Member Section
Providers
Contact Us
This section is available to members only, you will be prompted to enter a password
This section is available to members only, you will be prompted to enter a password
Please Feel Free to Inquire About Our Services
Identity theft refers to the preparatory stage of acquiring and collecting someone else's personal information for criminal purposes. As of January 8, 2010, Senate Bill S-4 became law, making it illegal to possess another person's identity information for criminal purposes.

What is Identity Theft?

Identity fraud is the actual deceptive use of the identity information of another person (living or dead) in connection with various frauds (including for example personating another person and the misuse of debit card or credit card data).



What is Identity Fraud?

Scale of the problem

Source: http: Royal Canadian Mounted Police //www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/scams-fraudes/id-theft-vol-eng.htm
Source: Department of Justice Canada http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/news-nouv/nr-cp/2007/doc_32179.html


One incident of identity fraud may have many victims, from the person whose identity is stolen and whose credit rating and reputation may be damaged, to the commercial and financial institutions that may cover losses resulting from use of stolen information, to the Canadian taxpayer, who may be harmed when false identities are used to obtain government documents or benefits.

It is difficult to determine an accurate number of victims of identity theft or identity fraud because they are not always reported, and when they are, they may be reported to a number of different authorities or organizations. However, a November 2006 Ipsos-Reid survey indicated that 73 per cent of Canadians are concerned about becoming victims of identity theft, and 28 per cent say they or someone they know has already been a victim of identity theft.

The Canadian Council of Better Business Bureaus has estimated that identity theft may cost Canadian consumers, banks and credit card firms, stores and other businesses more than $2 billion annually.